Posts tagged not for al

nybg:

biocanvas:

High-magnification cross section of an aloe plant
Aloe has been used for thousands of years—tracing all the way back to Egypt 6,000 years ago—to heal wounds and burns. This particular micrograph shows cells from Aloe erinacea, an aloe plant native to Namibia that is endangered due to habitat loss. Large, blue cells in the center are called xylem: they conduct water from the roots to the leaves. The small, circular clusters of cells are called phloem: they transport food made by the leaves to the rest of the plant.
Image by Anatoly Mikhaltsov.

Botany is beauty. ~AR

nybg:

biocanvas:

High-magnification cross section of an aloe plant

Aloe has been used for thousands of years—tracing all the way back to Egypt 6,000 years ago—to heal wounds and burns. This particular micrograph shows cells from Aloe erinacea, an aloe plant native to Namibia that is endangered due to habitat loss. Large, blue cells in the center are called xylem: they conduct water from the roots to the leaves. The small, circular clusters of cells are called phloem: they transport food made by the leaves to the rest of the plant.

Image by Anatoly Mikhaltsov.

Botany is beauty. ~AR

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Tamsin van Essen

Erosion Series

This work explores erosion and the disruption of form. Focusing on biological erosion, I wanted to convey the idea of a host being attacked and eaten away by a parasitic virus, highlighting the creeping spread of the infection as it corrupts the body. I have produced a series of angular porcelain forms, sandblasted to wear the surface and reveal inner strata. This aggressive process, contrarily, creates a delicate vulnerability in the shape. The translucency of the porcelain and the interruption of the surface make it possible to glimpse through to layers beneath, creating a tension between the seen and the obscured.